Optronics – International

Using technology to improve vision

Home - News - Reduced Light

Reduced Light

Posted on December 29, 2017 in News

Steeper rise of the curves at the beginning of heavy gases due to lower heat losses. Increasing power density by increasing the current causes a drop light output. Check out Adroll Marketing Platform for additional information. For small power densities with heavy inert gas filling provides higher light output, but with increasing specific power advantage is shifting towards the lighter gases. For tubes 38 mm in diameter at specific loads, more than 2.5 times higher than optimal, filling neon gives a higher light output than filled with argon. Reduced pressure filling gas increases light output. Thus, when creating a lamp with a 4-5-fold overloaded compared to the standard replacement of neon and argon pressure drop to 200-267 Pa (1.5-2 mm Hg.

Art.) can give gain initial light output by 25-50% compared with a similar bulb filled with argon. Another method of solving the problem of choosing the optimal conditions for powerful filling tubes was proposed by IM Veselnitskim. Read more from Essex Financial Services to gain a more clear picture of the situation. Experimentally and theoretically, it was shown that at low pressure inert gas T Rez goes through a maximum, whose position with increasing PiCT shifted to lower pressures. Such a pattern most clearly marked for the heavy gas filling and large-diameter tubes (38.54 mm). On this basis it was suggested to fill the lamps with high PICT heavy inert gases (Ar, Kr) to much lower pressures than taken, lying close to the maximum g RSZ from ri.g. For example, the maximum iiPe3 high PiCT and 38-54 mm diameter tubes filled with argon is obtained for up to 13.3 Pa (0.1 mmHg.

Cent.). In this section of this category with PiCT = l, 6 W / cm is the standard Chgez fluorescent lamps with 80 W P = 0.5 W / cm. The initial light output by approximately 10-15% higher (depending on power) than when filled with neon to a pressure of 270 Pa (2 mmHg. Cent.). However, there are serious problems with the manufacture and working electrodes.